Category Archives: Office 365

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Office 365 Exposed, Episode 17: Live from Ignite 2019

Tony and I are back again, this time from steamy Orlando. Recorded in the Podcast Center at Microsoft Ignite 2019, this episode features special guests from Microsoft: Mark Kashman, grand poobah of SharePoint, and Ross Smith IV, mobility ninja. Listen in to hear about Project Cortex, Microsoft Endpoint Manager, and a few other goodies. 

 

Episode 17 from Microsoft Ignite 2019!
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Office 365 Exposed, Episode 16

It’s everyone’s favorite time of the year: Ignite Season!

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In this episode, Tony and I are joined by Anna Chu from Microsoft; she has some pretty interesting answers to the questions we asked her about Microsoft Ignite, including why there’s an increased focus on developers and what she thinks the biggest change from years past is. Along the way, we also talk about the spreading evil of self-service license purchases and make a few predictions about things you might see from the show floor at Ignite.

 

Office 365 Exposed, episode 16

Good news– we’ll be recording an episode from Ignite this year, so plan to tune in week after next for more Ignite-y goodness.

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Seeking to drive adoption, Microsoft fumbles customer service

Let’s subtitle this post “A tale of two tickets.”

The other day, I got a request from one of my staff: could we please start using Shifts for scheduling his team’s on-call rotations? “Sure,” I said, little realizing what a journey that would entail. To make a long and painful story as short as possible: Shifts didn’t work in our tenant, so I filed a ticket, which took six weeks and multiple escalations before it got to someone who actually realized the problem (it was a back-end provisioning issue) and fixed it.

Six weeks. Hold that thought.

Now, a digression.

It is no big secret that Microsoft is working very, very hard to increase adoption of their cloud services. At their recent Inspire partner conference,  there was a steady drumbeat of adoption-focused messaging directed, loudly, at Microsoft partners, and many Microsoft partner and sales personnel have found that their fiscal year (FY) 2020 compensation is directly tied to increasing adoption. For example, one person I spoke to told me that in FY 2020, the target they were expected to meet was to drive Teams adoption in their target market year-over-year (YoY) up by more than 250%.

Now, really: I get it. Microsoft is selling their “three clouds” (Dynamics 365, Office 365, and Microsoft 365) as hard as they can, but the old phenomenon of “channel stuffing” rears its head when customers buy licenses for those three clouds and don’t use them fully. If you buy a bunch of O365 Enterprise E3 licenses, for example, but only use Exchange Online, Microsoft is worried that you might a) buy less expensive licenses at renewal or b) defect to Gmail. They therefore have a really strong interest in not only selling licenses for these services but ensuring that people actually use what they’ve paid for.

Not only that, if customers don’t use the licenses they already have, it’s darn hard to upsell them more expensive or more capable licenses. This is a major brake on Microsoft 365 adoption: it’s hard to sell people a new SKU for Windows 10 and Office 365 when they already have O365 licenses on a multi-year agreement and perpetual Win10 licenses on their existing devices.

Side note: Azure is of course a Microsoft cloud, and it absolutely has its own, and rather daunting, adoption and consumption targets, but since almost all Azure services are priced based on actual usage, the play in Azure-land is to get people to use more rather than to get more use out of what they’ve already bought. Thus the intense focus on topics such as “digital transformation,” which translates to “getting stuff out of your on-premises data centers and into Azure” and the various Azure security offerings (which translate to “pay us per-minute to do cool security stuff on your Azure-hosted resources.”)

To recap: Microsoft wants customers to use all of the workloads in their O365 or M365 SKUs because doing so helps them keep customers around longer and sell them more stuff. In fairness, customers can benefit too by getting better value (defined as “more productivity” or “better security” or whatever) from their existing investment, but I think Microsoft is mostly interested in this because “customers can benefit” directly turns into “customers give us money.”

With that background, you’d probably think that Microsoft is always looking for new ways to increase user adoption… and you’d be right. That explains the mail I received this morning.

It looked like a support ticket, but I figured it must just be a decent phishing attempt. After all, I didn’t open a ticket, so the “Your request…” language was suspicious. Then I read it and damn near threw my coffee mug at the monitor.

Why?

Think about it. This is Microsoft sending me a “support ambassador” to try to convince me to use more of their services, i.e. to increase adoption, in a test tenant with only 1 paid license… something which only benefits Microsoft.

Meanwhile, users in my production tenant have to wait SIX WEEKS to get an actual problem fixed, one that directly affects their ability to work. Oh, by the way, fixing that problem would drive adoption of the service! We wanted to use Shifts but couldn’t until the problem was fixed– so no need to manufacture a fake support ticket to try to get me engaged.

Apparently there are enough “support ambassadors” roaming around to waste time dunning the admin of a single-user test tenant because “[their] system detected that not all users are using the services included.” Now, of course I realize that the “support ambassadors” here are not really support engineers in the same mold as the people who answer, y’know, actual support requests. What this email really means is that Microsoft is spending money on trying to drive adoption that would be spent better on the actual support organization.

This is part of the same tiring and worrisome trend we’ve seen in Office 365 for years now, where Microsoft does questionable stuff behind their customers’ backs. Here are a few examples:

  • Contacting the tenant admin (me in this case) to drive adoption based on data I haven’t seen about what my users were doing– perhaps this would be an unpleasant surprise to admins who don’t realize that user usage data is used for this purpose
  • Faking a support ticket as a means to fool customers into thinking they should read the adoption-related propaganda. (I split this one out separately because it irritates me so much.)
  • Pushing feedback surveys directly to Teams end users. Here’s some feedback for y’all: don’t talk directly to my organization’s end users without permission. Interestingly, the Teams team has made no public comment on this feature despite the uniformly negative feedback I have heard they’ve received.
  • Sticking transport rules into customer’s Exchange Online tenants. (Hear more about that here.)
  • Magically generating O365 Group objects from distribution groups and making them appear in the GAL
  • Turning on any number of other features by default so that they appear to end users with little or no warning. I do appreciate that the roadmap communications have gotten more detailed, and more frequent, as the service has matured, but since I still don’t know exactly when feature X will hit my tenant, it’s harder to do adoption and change management than it should be.

MVPs have a reputation for giving Microsoft candid and honest feedback, so here it is in two short digestible sound bites.

First, tighten up the support organization so that it doesn’t take multiple weeks to fix any problem. I can migrate a 100,000+ user organization in the amount of time it takes Microsoft to recognize and fix simple provisioning problems.

Second, stop bypassing (or trying to bypass) the tenant admins. Be very, very judicious with which new features are on by default; provide admin controls for new features on day 1 (and not later), and don’t assume that your customers are OK with you interacting directly with their end users.

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Office 365 Exposed, Episode 15

Just a little palate cleanser this time before Microsoft Inspire gets started! Tony, Vasil, and I talk about Teams security, the Search-Mailbox cmdlet’s journey to Death Row, and whether or not emoji reactions in email are a tool of the devil.

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2020 edition of Office 365 for IT Pros now available

It’s July 1, so you know what that means… or maybe you don’t: the new edition of Office 365 for IT Pros is available. Each year, around this time, we release a new edition. herewith a rude Q&A that might be informative and/or useful (but probably not entertaining)

Q: It isn’t 2020. Why are you calling it the 2020 edition?
A: Car manufacturers do this too. Unlike cars not made by Tesla, though, we release monthly updates to upgrade and update the thing you buy today into the next calendar year.

Q: What’s different about this edition?
A: The cover has a new animal on it.

Q: No, seriously, what’s different?
A: We reorganized the content, so now there’s a separate companion volume (included with your purchase, of course) that holds some older material. This frees up space and word count for new stuff. In this edition, MVP and identity management legend Brian Desmond took over the IdM chapter from me, which automatically makes the book at least 16% better. There’s also significant new content covering new features in Planner, Teams, Intune, SharePoint Online, OneDrive for Business, and the various other parts of Office 365.

Q: What are your plans for updates to this edition?
A: We’ve already covered a ton of 2019 updates in this initial edition– for example, the switch to the “Microsoft 365 admin center” branding and all of the new goodies around information protection are included. Microsoft has already publicly announced or started to RTM several major new features that we’ll be covering, including information barriers for Teams. Then there’s a whole shedload of new stuff that Microsoft has discussed under NDA that we’ll be covering once it’s publicly mentioned. Plus, there is always room for surprises, like the rainbow themes Microsoft added to the admin center, OWA, and a few other apps in June 2019.

All joking aside, we’ve got lots of new content planned for the book, and one key advantage of our book is that you’re buying a year’s worth of updates, not a single point-in-time copy. As Microsoft evolves and grows Office 365, we cover the changes to help you learn what you need to effectively plan and manage your Office 365 deployment. I hope you’ll give the new edition a look and let us know what you think.

 

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Microsoft Teams privacy bug: the cat and the camera

As longtime readers probably know, I have a cat. As cats do, he will sometimes jump on my desk.

Pancake, looking majestic

Pancake the cat on his royal pillow

Some of you may know that, because my job entails working with a worldwide team, I often have early-morning conference calls. To make this easier, I have a small workstation in my bedroom where I can work and be near the coffee machine. This machine is set up with a Logitech c920 webcam and a Blue Snowball USB microphone.

Most of you probably don’t know that I tend to pace when on telephone calls.

So picture the scene. I’ve straggled out of bed to grab a cup of coffee, yawn and stretch, and get on a call. I’m pacing around and speaking. Suddenly the gentleman I’m speaking to (my long-suffering counterpart, Tony Sterling, who owns our customer experience team) starts cracking up. “Dude, turn your camera off!”

Sure enough, somehow the Teams app had started showing Tony video of me pacing around in my boxers and T-shirt. Thankfully it was only him. I apologized deeply, turned off the camera, and removed Pancake from the keyboard. After the meeting, I scoured the Teams documentation to find out what the keyboard shortcut for controlling the camera was.

There isn’t one. This made me a little nervous, nervous enough to put a Post-It note over the camera lens so Pancake didn’t accidentally turn on the camera one night when I was asleep or something.

Today I was in a Teams meeting. The cat jumped on the keyboard and… voila… I got a macOS permissions dialog asking me whether Teams should have permission to use the camera. He’d done it again!

It turns out that when you’re in a Teams meeting, hitting a key will act like a mouse click on whatever control currently has focus. By default, the camera on/off button has focus. Try it yourself: join a meeting, switch out of the Teams app and back into it, and hit a key.

This is, shall we say, not a great design. I appreciate that the Teams team has provided keyboard focus selection, which is great for accessibility, but having focus default to camera on/off is a recipe for unpleasant surprises.

Lesson learned: since I can’t keep my cat off the keyboard, I’ll keep my webcam covered.

 

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Office 365 Exposed, Episode 14

It’s MVP Summit week, and you know what that means: another episode! This time, Tony and I were joined by Greg Taylor and Brent Alinger from Microsoft. We discussed a rash of topics, including the impending death end of support for Exchange 2010, new announcements from the Microsoft Teams team at Enterprise Connect, and a rather surprising fact about SharePoint retention and your document library. Share and enjoy!

(editor’s note: this podcast was the first one where we experimented with audio postproduction so do let us know if the sound quality is better or worse than usual!)

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