2-factor Lync authentication and missing Exchange features

Two-factor authentication (or just 2FA) is increasingly important as a means of controlling access to a variety of systems. I’m delighted that SMS-based authentication  (which I wrote about in 2008), has become a de facto standard for many banks and online services. Microsoft bought PhoneFactor and offers its SMS-based system as part of multi-factor authentication for Azure, which makes it even easier to deploy 2FA in your own applications.

Customers have been demanding 2FA for Lync, Exchange, and other on-premises applications for a while now. Exchange supports the use of smart cards for authentication with Outlook Anywhere and OWA, and various third parties such as RSA have shipped authentication solutions that support other authentication factors, such as one-time codes or tokens. Lync, however, has been a little later to the party. With the July 2013 release of Lync Server 2013 CU2, Lync supports the use of smart cards (whether physical or virtual) as an authentication mechanism. Recently I became aware that there are some Lync features that aren’t available when the client authenticates with a smart card– that’s because the client authenticates to two different endpoints. It authenticates to Lync using two-factor authentication, but the Lync client can’t currently authenticate to Exchange using the same smart card, so services based on access through Exchange Web Services (EWS) won’t work. The docs say that this is “by design,” which I hope means “we didn’t have time to get to it yet.”

The result of this limitation means that Lync 2013 clients using 2FA cannot use several features, including

  • the Unified Contact Store. You’ll need to use Invoke-CsUcsRollback to disable Lync 2FA users’ UCS access if you’ve enabled it.
  • the ability to automatically set presence based on the user’s calendar state, i.e. the Lync client will no longer set your presence to “out of office”, “in a meeting,” etc. based on what’s on your calendar. Presence that indicates call states such as “in a conference call” still works.
  • integration with the Exchange-based Conversation History folder. If you’ve configured the use of Exchange 2013 as an archive for Lync on the server side, that still works.
  • Access to high-definition user photos
  • The ability to see and access Exchange UM voicemail messages from the Lync client

These limitations weren’t fixed in CU3, but I am hopeful that a not-too-distant future version of the client will enable full 2FA use. In the meantime, if you’re planning on using 2FA, keep these limitations in mind.

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1 Comment

Filed under General Tech Stuff, UC&C

One response to “2-factor Lync authentication and missing Exchange features

  1. Paul,
    Thanks for the professional post here.
    For those seeking for Two Factor Authentication without any functional limitation on mobile devices, i suggest having a look at http://www.LyncShield.com
    The product also offers other security features such as Active Directory password protection and Dos attacks protection

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